twospiritflag

The Resurgence of Two Spirited

Two Spirit people are now reclaiming their power they once had prior to colonization.

Communities have their own pride days to honor Two Spirit people for example:

Beardy’s & Okemasis First Nation held their own Two Spirit Pride Festival in 2016 and their first Two Spirited pow-wow in 2019 to show all community members the love and support that all should receive.

Two Spirit activists have been doing a lot of work alongside the Queer community to address issues both groups face and will continue to do so with the freedom they now possess. 

 

Source: https://www.outsaskatoon.ca/two_spirit1

Tips for Effective and Respectful Interactions

  • Don’t assume you can tell if someone is LGBTQ/Two Spirit
  • Respect the need for confidentiality
  • Understand the differences between “coming out” as lesbian, bisexual, or gay and “coming out” as transgendered
  • Do not tolerate anti-LGBTQ/Two spirit remarks or humor in public spaces
  • If you don’t know what pronouns to use, ask
  • Be patient with a person who is questioning their gender identity
  • Don’t tell a person what “category” or “identity” they fit into
  • Don’t ask a transgendered person what their “real name” is
  • Don’t ask about a transgendered person’s genitals or surgical status
  • Don’t ask a transgendered person how they have sex
  • Know your own limits as an ally

Source: http://www.tribal-institute.org/2014/INCTwo-SpiritBooklet.pdf

Terminology

Sex: sex is comprised of DNA, hormones, genitalia, resproductive organs, and secondary sex characteristics. Sex is often seen as defining a person’s gender – think gender reveal parties. However, sex does not determine gender, it simply tells us about a person’s body and body parts.

Gender: The way a person identifies themselves and experiences gender internally. Gender is inherently different from the sex one is assigned at birth. It is the sense of being a woman, man, non-binary or any other gender. It involves gender roles (the expectations and norms imposed on a person because of their gender), gender attribution (how others perceive a person’s gender), and gender identity (how a person labels their own gender).

Gender Expression: The way a person outwardly expresses their gender (whether it be feminine, masculine, both or neither) through clothing, makeup, hair, and body language.

Sexual Orientation: A person’s natural attraction to other people, or to no one. Attraction is a healthy and natural part of a person’s identity. Historically many cultures believed that same gender or multiple gender attraction was the norm.

Intersex: The term for people who have variations in their chromosomes, reproductive organs, hormones, or genitalia that aren’t easily categorized into female or male. Intersex people may have variations in one or more sex traits.

Gender: One’s expressions of masculinity, femininity, or androgyny in words, persons, organisms, or characteristics.

Gender Expression: The way a person outwardly expresses their gender (whether it be feminine, masculine, both or neither) through clothing, makeup, hair, and body language.

Cisgender: A person whose gender is the same as the gender they were assigned at birth. For example, a woman who was assigned female at birth and grew up always identifying as a woman is a cisgender woman.

Transgender: A person whose gender is different from the gender they were assigned at birth. For example, a person who was assigned female at birth but grew up knowing they were a boy and man is a transgender man.

Gay: A person who is attracted to people of the same gender. Historically the term was used exclusively for men who were attracted to men. It has also been used as an umbrella term to refer to the entire 2SLGBTQ community. Today we are shifting to using the term queer.

Lesbian: A person (woman or non-binary) who is exclusively attracted to women. Historically this term was only used for women who were attracted to women, however today we include non-binary people who are exclusively attracted to women.

Asexual: A person does not experience, or experiences very little sexual attraction towards people. A person who is asexual can have sex and even enjoy it, but they generally do not experience the desire to have sex.

Bisexual: A person who is attracted to two (or more) genders. Some bisexual people define their identity as being attracted to women and men, while others may define their identity as being attracted to their own and other genders.

Pansexual: A person who is attracted to people regardless of their gender.

Questioning: Refers to individuals who are in the process of figuring out how they feel about and what language fits best for their sexual orientation, gender, and/or gender expression.

Ally: A person who supports and advocates for queer identities and the queer community. They do so by actively challenging homophobic and/or transphobic behaviour, language, and systems that disadvatage or hurt queer people. Allies also work on their own learned behaviour and biases. Any person who actively supports Two Spirit, Trans, and Queer people, whether inside or outside of the 2SLGBTQ community, can be an ally.

Coming Out: The ongoing process of someone acknowledging their sexuality and/or gender to themselves and to others. Coming out is a process that is specifc to each person and does not have a set timeline or process. A person can come out in whatever way feels best for them. This may look like telling people face-to-face, writing a letter, or calling or texting people.

Drag: An artform and important part of queer culture that allows people to express themselves through makeup, performance, attire, dance, and music. Drag is often a way for a person to explore gender, whether through a critical or playful lense. A person of any gender can perform as a Drag King, Queen, or Thing.

Discrimination Terms

Homophobia: Discrimination that is targeted at 2SLGBTQ people, or those perceived to be part of the community. Homophobia relies on beliefs that being part of the 2SLGBTQ community is unnatural and abnormal and that this justifies discrimination, acts of hate, and violence.

Outing: Revealing someone’s gender or sexual orientation without their consent and against their wishes.

Transphobia: Discrimination that is targeted at Transgender people. Transphobia relies on beliefs that being transgender is unnatural and abnormal and that this justifies discrimination, acts of hate, and violence towards trans people.

Sources & a complete list of terminology:

https://www.outsaskatoon.ca/queer_terms

http://www.tribal-institute.org/2014/INCTwo-SpiritBooklet.pdf

Indigenous Terminology

Ojibwe – Okitcitakwe – (warrior woman)

Ojibwe – Ogokwe (warrior man)

Navaho- Nadle (weaver transformed, that which changes, or he who transforms)

Dakota/Lakota- Wintike (double woman)

Inukititut- Sipiniq (infant whose sex changes at birth)

Mohawk- Onón:wat (I have the pattern of two spirits inside my body)

Nehiyah Gender 

Ayaahkwew: Non-binary / Genderfluid

Iskwew: Cisgender woman

Iskwehikan: Transgender woman / Trans-femme

Napehikan: Transgender man / Trans-masc

Napew: Cisgender man

 

Source: https://www.outsaskatoon.ca/two_spirit1